Architectural Visions Printed in 3D

December 18, 2014

Real-life models of 3D objects remain an important part of architectural visualizations. Objects that were laboriously modeled in the recent past are now printed in 3D – also using Cinema 4D.

 

Models in the field of architecture have a long tradition, from the models of historic cities made of cork, which the wealthy nobility had built in the 17th century, to the models used in the 50s and 60s for the reconstruction of German cities that were bombed in WWII. Since architects have been able to develop projects using 3D software they can not only use the files for planning and construction but also to create real-world models of their projects using 3D printers.

 

Ulrich Schneidt recognized this trend early on and offers complete 3D printing services through his studio MindModel Services. His studio focuses on the needs of architects, engineers and construction planners. As a result of his extensive experience with Allplan, both as a user and in sales, Ulrich has an in-depth understanding of the field of architecture and knows what makes it tick. “Currently, architectural visualizations are primarily created using images but it’s very apparent that architects need other ways of presenting their work. Physical models are a detailed representation of the final design. They are excellent for promoting the communication between planners and clients,” says Ulrich.

 

Depending on the project in question, planning offices are constantly looking for new ways of presenting their work. “Clients are generally skeptical of new methods such as 3D printing, which is compounded by the fact that they are not yet familiar with any professional 3D printing processes,” remembers Ulrich.

 

The fact that project files for the pilot project could be used from the planning phase to animation and 3D printing convinced Ulrich’s client Hauser Massivbau GmbH to give 3D printing a try. The MindModel team started by creating an animation in Cinema 4D for the project and then adapted this model for use in 3D printing.

 

 

 

To read the full article, click here.

 

 

Please reload

Featured

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

Recent Posts
Please reload